Mehul Choksi’s Gitanjali Gems to shut down, employees told to take relieving letters

Gtanjali Gems, the gems retailer drove by Nirav Modi’s uncle Mehul Choksi, requested that its workers take alleviating letters Tuesday.

It is set to shut down days after Punjab National Bank, India’s second biggest state loan specialist, revealed a misrepresentation which supposedly includes no less than three firms controlled by Modi, an extremely rich person gem dealer, and others by Choksi (counting Gitanjali Gems).

Almost, 5,000 workers of the gathering have been given the pink slip. In the mean time, the Enforcement Directorate proceeded with its crackdown on Gitanjali assemble on Tuesday with assaults at 20 premises the nation over.

Focal Bureau of Investigation today addressed 10 administrators of Gitanjali and 8 officials having a place with the Nirav Modi gathering.

Both Nirav Modi and Mehul Choksi have left the nation.

In an administrative recording, Gitanjali Gems has denied Choksi’s inclusion in the affirmed extortion. Modi’s legal counselor, as well, denies the claims against him.

In an administrative recording, Gitanjali Gems has denied Choksi’s inclusion in the affirmed extortion. Modi’s legal counselor, as well, denies the claims against him.

“All affirmations (against Modi) aren’t right,” said Vijay Aggarwal, Nirav Modi’s guard attorney.

The PNB body of evidence against his customer, the legal counselor guaranteed, would inevitably crash and burn amid the trial.

“No one is taking a gander at it judiciously. This is the thing that occurs in every one of the cases. That occurred in the Bofors case, that occurred in the 2G case and it occurred in a portion of the coal cases. What’s more, this will occur for this situation too. No one has taken a gander at it soundly,” Aggarwal said.

“What amount does it take for a precious stone trader to change over it (resources) into jewels and take them away? He would have shut everything, changed over them into precious stones and flee.”

In a letter to PNB, Nirav Modi said the bank has risked its odds of recouping wholes owed by opening up to the world about its claims.